Summer Solstice 2020

June 21, 2020

Week 14 of COVID-19 self-quarantine

Greetings of peace and renewal on Summer Solstice 2020. And what a year it’s been so far!

Six months of constant changes and challenges. Most of us are learning how to adjust to life in the pandemic era. And, it’s not over yet folks, so stay cautious.

‘Summer solstice occurs on the longest day of the year, usually on June 21. Although, the sun’s position remains in pretty much the same place for a few days either side. For Neolithic people, sunlight would have been crucial – for warmth for them and their animals and for helping their crops to grow!’

Last night, I watched a live video of the sun setting over Stonehenge. There’s also a live video of the sun rise. Both videos are posted on the English Heritage Facebook page.

I toasted to the sun with a glass of wine and a few tears as I tried to wrap my head around the immense history of the human race represented here. Sometimes I wonder what will become of us. We take three steps forward and two steps back. We destroy the natural world which was created to sustain us. Let’s do better!

 

June is the month of five birthdays in my family. I celebrated mine at my dog-sitting job. There was a pool and a lovely view—along with sweet, cuddly dogs. I call my overnights ‘sleeping with the dogs.’

 

So here’s to however many more weeks it takes for us to figure out how to ‘lower the curve’ of COVID-19 infections. We miss seeing the grandkids!


Reading Patti Smith

January 21, 2020

“Age changes you in ways you least expect” I heard this quote in a movie last week, but can’t remember which one. I thought about it off and on for a few days with the conclusion that this is most certainly a true statement.

Sitting outside a coffee shop, reading Patti Smith’s book “My Train,” I became filled with a thoughtfulness regarding my life. Feeling like a cheap imitation of Smith, I start writing on a scrap piece of paper thoughts for a post.

I’ve always been aware of Patti Smith because of her music. Often called the “punk poet laureate,” Smith has an impressive musical repertoire which still influences many.

After reading “Just Kids” a few years ago, I became a huge fan of her literary mind as well. I am at the same time appreciative and envious of her experiences and courage to travel her many creative paths—all while keeping in mind the difficulties of her life which arrived uninvited.

From my 2013 Twitter: I wonder what compels me to constantly try to do things out of my comfort zone?

Was I courageous in the paths I took in my life? Did I travel to places I always wanted to see? Did I follow a risky decision to some sort of personal transcendent conclusion? Can I still call myself a life-long learner? Am I still willing to explore new things out of my comfort zone? Yes and No.

Yes. In the summer of 2018 the hubby and I took a 5K mile road trip—in our Ford Fiesta–up to Minnesota, down to Nebraska over to Colorado and across to New Mexico—stopping on the way to see family and friends. No. I vow never to do this again.

Yes. I still read fiction and non-fiction. I recently discovered Wired magazine which I admit to some of it being over my head, but I’m learning. No. I don’t finish books that don’t grab me in the first chapter or two.

Mom and me. She had me reading at a very young age.

My mother used to say ‘only boring people get bored.’ Though I often say to others I have no regrets in this life, I occasionally lament some of my mistakes. But my life was not and is not boring. May your life be the same.

Yes, I out of my comfort zone riding the tram in Telluride.

A younger me with my son who I raised as a single mother.


Advice in Four Words or Less

June 10, 2019

Today’s blog is a total Twitter rip-off. Thanks to Giles Paley-Phillips @eliistender10 for asking the question: Your best advice in four words or less.

This a fraction of the replies, but worthy of sharing.

Walter Shaub
@waltshaub
do the right thing
Art Thiel
@Art_Thiel

1. Don’t sweat petty things.
2. Don’t pet sweaty things. (h/t George Carlin)

Rogue EPA
@RogueEPAstaff
Don’t vote Republican 2020.

Patrick Leiser
@leiser_patrick
Even better: Don’t vote Republican ever

Rachel Wolfson
@wolfiecomedy
smoke weed every day

Cliff Jerrison
@pervocracy
Condoms, sunscreen, vaccines, seatbelts.

Of Coffee and Jellies

April 23, 2018

A couple of weeks ago, I attended the annual San Antonio Public Library’s Book Festival. Out of a good many speakers, I chose to hear Juli Berwald the author of Spineless–the science of Jellyfish and the art of growing a backbone. She was very good–entertaining and well-versed in jellyfish. So now I am about half way through the book. The hubby is reading it as well. Who would have thunk it! Jellyfish are quite the animal! I’m looking up Jellyfish documentaries on Netflix asap.

I recently read The Monk of Mokha a tale of Yemen, coffee and a tenaciously motivated young man who resurrectes the coffee trade in Yemen. If you think this would be a bland read, guess again. It’s as rich as Yemeni coffee itself. And, there’s the volatile, multi-leg journey racing across Yemen–as it turns into a war zone–carrying his coffee samples to the conference that will make or break his multi-year efforts. Dave Eggers is the author and he never disappoints.

The newest book from Yan Martel, author of Life of Pi, is The High Mountains of Portugal. Three seemingly different tales weaving together with a slightly surreal tinge. Parts of it seems to go on a bit, but stick with it for a fine reading experience.

I dearly love British crime/mysteries whether they be books, TV shows or movies. Author Alex Marwood was recently recommended by Stephen King on Twitter. I figured her books were damn good if he recommended them. The Wicked Girls and The Darkest Secret are psychological thrillers hard to put down till you get to the end. And, as the Brits might say ‘bloody good characters’ as well.

Get a book or three this week and happy reading.


Letter to my blog

November 2, 2017

Dear ‘A Small Blog’,

I’m sorry I have neglected you lately. We’ve been together for so long, and I miss our little conversations. I have been reading, watching Netflix, working, going to the gym, sometimes to a museum. I have a lot of work to do as President of Friends of Spare Parts Board of Directors–a job I am so proud of.

I know you think I have abandoned you for Facebook and Twitter. I promise to think some pithy thoughts to share very soon.

Much love and affection,

Laura

 

 

 

 

 


Waiting to read

March 29, 2015

kindle and booksThis is a little list of some of the books I’ve recently read–mostly while sitting in hospital rooms or doctors’ waiting rooms. My husband had two episodes of seizures, one in November and one in January. He spent a some time in the hospital and subsequently at various doctors’ offices. Many tests were done and no particular medical reason has yet been established. Texas law dictates that after one has a seizure, one may not drive for three months. So, with Kindle in hand, I’ve been the designated driver. Titles comes with links to the books on Amazon, followed by short personal opines.

Sistina by Brian Kenneth Swain  Not just because he is a friend, I say this is an excellent read. The link is to the review I wrote on Amazon. From there I recommend purchasing and enjoying.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel This story interweaves in different and intriguing  ways from other post-apocalyptic books I’ve read. It’s sweet, suspenseful and leaves you with hope for the human race. And, yes, I am drawn to that particular genre.

Marco Polo-The Journey that changed the world by John Man  I bought this nonfiction book after watching the Netflix Marco Polo series–with naked women ninjas and other such highly suspect re-enactments of Marco’s life under the Khan. The author really dug (pun intended) into archaeological evidence, and tracked down a great deal of historical data. If you want the most true story of Marco Polo, read this.

Colorless Tskuru Tazaki and his years of pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami I love this Japanese author. He writes enigmatic, intense character novels. This is his latest, but not greatest. Read Kafka on the Shore to be blown away.

Wonderful Tonight by Pattie Boyd As a young woman, Pattie was married to Beatle George Harrison until Eric Clapton ‘stole’ her away. Were they matches made in heaven? Not quite. She led a very interesting life and tells it with great insight and candor, revealing the true personalities of two of the greatest music icons of my age.

Gould’s Book of Fish  Magnificently written, fact-based fiction by Tasmanian author Richard Flanagan. Full of graphic imagery often written with wry sense of humor, it’s not for readers with tender constitutions. Still, if you want real literature, it’s a must read.


It’s all about words

May 11, 2014
puppies

CUTE!

cute kittens

CUTE!

kitten and puppy

TOO CUTE!

My granddaughter told me the other day, “Grandma, you think everything is ‘cute’.” To me, that indictment was a clear indication I had become word lazy and adjective deficient.  The fact that a 7th grader called me out was embarrassing. So, I did some research and came up with these alternatives to the word ‘cute.’

 lovable     ambrosial     appealing     attractive     captivating     charming
darling     dear     delectable     delicious     delightful     dishy     dreamy     fetching     heavenly   hot     luscious     pleasing     precious     sexy     suave    nice looking   striking

 Now, when I look at this list, I can’t imagine these words were meant to substitute for ‘cute’ in every instance. However it’s a good start.

What I learned from @lettergirl aka Dawn Cole at the #blogitsatx conference was a lesson taken to heart. She encouraged us to find new words, write them down and use them. Get out the Thesaurus and dictionaries and, above all, read.

Next time my granddaughter and I talk, I’ll ‘wow’ her with my new words.

 

 Photo credit fanpop.com and collectionphotos.com