Posted by: Laura Carter | September 8, 2017

Cataract Surgery for Dummies

Disclaimer: Personal experience, certified patient only.

Getting older has its foibles and its perks. Part of the aging process that affects most of us is development of cataracts-a clouding of the eye’s natural lens which becomes progressively opaque. Science and technology have advanced the removal and replacement of the lens to a great degree over the past several decades.

Cataracts typically develop over a couple of years’ time. When mine became thick enough to remove, I was definitely having difficulty seeing. When it got to the point where I couldn’t read road signs, I finally admitted I needed to have surgery. Even then, I obsessed over the “surgery” part and put it off for a few more months.

My eye physician Dr. Pittard and all his staff are excellent, efficient and helpful. By their ages I would guess none of them has undergone the procedure themselves. But they do have feedback of the experience from probably thousands of patients who have gotten their cataracts removed at their facilities.

When you have cataract surgery, they replace the thickened, cloudy lens in your eyes (first one and then the other a few weeks later). It puts your eyes on auto-correct. Near sighted to far sighted. Which means if you have been wearing glasses to see far, but can see up close, the opposite is now the case.  And, you may or not need reading glasses—which can be prescription or over-the-counter. In my case, I also have astigmatism, which is not auto-corrected. I chose to pay the extra money (because most insurances will not cover the expense) for a toric lens which will correct most degrees of–but not all– astigmatism.

Finally, after the lenses on both eyes are done, I tell family and friends I feel like I have bionic vision. Not the real bionic kind of course, but from a person who has been wearing glasses since the age of six and has always had fuzzy vision (even up close) it seemed pretty amazing to me.

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Me and hubby in New Mexico

Couple of things:No one can tell you exactly how you will experience the operation or afterwards. Each eye may react in different ways. i.e. my right eye seemed less scratchy feeling after surgery than the left.

It was relatively painless. I didn’t even have to take off my clothes except for my shirt and shoes. There was a gown, a quick IV, some med history taken and instructions for after surgery. Weird visual effects during the 10-minute procedure reminded me of the old light shows at the Vulcan Gas Company back the sixties.

The time in between surgeries can be a bit weird. Wearing your old glasses with the fixed eye lens popped out is strange. In my case, I was unable to do even that and went for three weeks with great vision in one eye and fuzzy in the other—annoyed, disconcerting, but doable.

I almost forgot to say, be prepared to now see all the dirt, dust and stains you missed when cleaning with cataracts.

Also, people have say I look younger in my new glasses, an unexpected but welcome side-effect. I do wear glasses (much less thick lenses) some of the time, especially if I am driving because the toric lenses didn’t correct all the astigmatism–not uncommon if your astigmatism was severe.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask. I can only tell you my experience, but if it helps…

 


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